Volume 78, Issue 6 p. 1011-1016
Clinical Science

The Additional Effect of a Dentifrice on the Instant Efficacy of Toothbrushing: A Crossover Study

S. Paraskevas

Corresponding Author

S. Paraskevas

Department of Periodontology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Correspondence: Dr. Spiros Paraskevas, Department of Periodontology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Louwesweg 1, 1066 EA Amsterdam, The Netherlands. E-mail: [email protected].Search for more papers by this author
N.A.F. Rosema

N.A.F. Rosema

Department of Periodontology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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P. Versteeg

P. Versteeg

Department of Periodontology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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M.F. Timmerman

M.F. Timmerman

Department of Periodontology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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U. van der Velden

U. van der Velden

Department of Periodontology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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G.A. van der Weijden

G.A. van der Weijden

Department of Periodontology, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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First published: 01 June 2007
Citations: 43

Abstract

Background: Inconclusive evidence exists in the literature with regard to the additional (beneficial) mechanical effect of a dentifrice on plaque removal. A previous split-mouth study found that a dentifrice did not contribute to plaque removal. Because of limitations of the split-mouth model, a crossover design was used to evaluate whether a commercially available dentifrice had an additional effect on mechanical plaque removal during manual toothbrushing.

Methods: Thirty-six subjects were given a manual toothbrush and a standard dentifrice. After a 48-hour plaque accumulation, subjects brushed under supervision with or without a dentifrice (total time of 2 minutes) in a 2 × 2 crossover design.

Results: Plaque reductions were 50% with and 56% without the use of dentifrice. This 6% difference was statistically significant (P = 0.034). Explorative analysis showed that brushing without a dentifrice was more effective in removing plaque on the approximal surfaces.

Conclusions: The use of a dentifrice did not contribute to mechanical plaque removal during manual toothbrushing. It seemed that the mechanical action provided by the toothbrush was the main factor in the plaque-removing process.