Volume 83, Issue 7 p. 885-892
Clinical Science

Enamel Matrix Protein Adsorption to Root Surfaces in the Presence or Absence of Human Blood

Richard J. Miron

Richard J. Miron

Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern.

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Dieter D. Bosshardt

Dieter D. Bosshardt

Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern.

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Oliver Laugisch

Oliver Laugisch

Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

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Christos Katsaros

Christos Katsaros

Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern.

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Daniel Buser

Daniel Buser

Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern.

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Anton Sculean

Corresponding Author

Anton Sculean

Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Correspondence: Anton Sculean, University of Bern, Dental School, Department of Periodontology, Freiburgstrasse 7, 3010, Bern, Switzerland. Fax: 41-31-632-49-15; e-mail: [email protected].Search for more papers by this author
First published: 01 July 2012
Citations: 16

Abstract

Background: The clinical use of an enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has been shown to promote formation of new cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and bone and to significantly enhance the clinical outcomes after regenerative periodontal surgery. It is currently unknown to what extent the bleeding during periodontal surgery may compete with EMD adsorption to root surfaces. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of blood interactions on EMD adsorption to root surfaces mimicking various clinical settings and to test their ability to influence human PDL cell attachment and proliferation.

Methods: Teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were subjected to ex vivo scaling and root planing and treated with 24% EDTA, EMD, and/or human blood in six clinically related settings to determine the ability of EMD to adsorb to root surfaces. Surfaces were analyzed for protein adsorption via scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemical staining with an anti-EMD antibody. Primary human PDL cells were seeded on root surfaces and quantified for cell attachment and cell proliferation.

Results: Plasma proteins from blood samples altered the ability of EMD to adsorb to root surfaces on human teeth. Samples coated with EMD lacking blood demonstrated a consistent even layer of EMD adsorption to the root surface. In vitro experiments with PDL cells demonstrated improved cell attachment and proliferation in all samples coated with EMD (irrespective of EDTA) when compared to samples containing human blood.

Conclusion: Based on these findings, it is advised to minimize blood interactions during periodontal surgeries to allow better adsorption of EMD to root surfaces.